During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
Huge fan of Bend-It, I would not consider buying any other brand of ball. I have 4 or 5 different styles that have been used and abused during club training and off-season indoor games. It's fun watching another coach pick it out of a crowd of balls to check the brand. I've even had a pro player pick this ball out of a crowd to use in group training sessions (Go STL FC!!)
Our next soccer ball on the list is the DribbleUp Smart Soccer Ball. This ball is the second (and only other) “smart” ball on our list. Like the Adidas brand ball, this DribbleUp ball is designed for use with a smart device and application for training. There are a lot of features to love about this ball; however, it’s more expensive than the Adidas alternative.
A soccer ball can look awesome, but if it lacks good response you're never going to fall in love with it. Your game really comes down to how well your ball performs. One trick you can do in the store to test a ball's performance is to give it a spin in the air. A well-balanced ball should spin smoothly. That will mean smooth sailing on the field. If you can, try it out. Try several of them until you find the one that feels just right.

Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.
During the game, there were two different balls used: the 12 panel Argentine players model like this one and a T-shaped model used by Uruguay. There’s speculation the use of the two different balls actually played a part in the outcome of the game. Argentina started using this 12-panel ball and entered the halftime with a 2-1 lead. However, the T-shaped model used in the second half worked towards Uruguay’s advantage as they won 4-2 by the end of the match.
Voit goes a way back since its foundation in 1922 in providing the best soccer balls to all soccer fans and professional players. By the end of the 1920, the company introduced the first fully molded rubber soccer ball. They also came with the needle like air retention valves. They later invented a technology that allowed the balls to be machine wound with sturdy nylon threads over the rubber bladder. This ensured that the soccer balls would be stronger and more consistent. It also made balls cheaper and more available since they can be produced in mass production.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.

However, by selling out so hard in terms of responsiveness, the Mikasa has painted itself into a bit of a corner. Specifically, the synthetic leather casing makes this ball unsuitable for use on any surface outside of natural grass.In fact, even artificial grass will begin to wear down this ball once the glossy finish has been worn away. When you factor in the machine stitching, you end up with one of the least durable soccer balls on our list.
Please note, there are only 3 sizes available for this model; size 5, size 4, and size 3. So it is crucial that if you are looking for size 2 or size 1, then this is not an option for you. So, choose the right size before buying so that you don’t regret after receiving the purchase. If you are not sure which size means what then click here to read our guideline.
This was one of the few soccer balls that came our way that didn’t come inflated out of the box. How well the ball is inflated will depend on the long-term viability of the butyl bladder in this ball. When properly inflated with the correct needle, the air can be held for weeks, or even months, at a time. Compared to latex bladders, which need to be inflated about once per week on average, this Nike soccer ball offers a minimal maintenance experience. As a practice and play ball, the Nike Pitch Premier League Soccer Ball offers players a number of options that can help them improve their skills.
With all of those accolades, you might be a bit surprised that this is only rated as the best training soccer ball we reviewed rather than the best performing. For the most part, those questions are warranted as the first two layers of this soccer ball are made out of great materials. The casing is made of TPU, which provides a solid amount of durability, but it is the lining that stands out. With both polyester and EVA, this ball is easier to kick for longer periods without suffering from fatigue.
Much as we are grateful to use the latest technology in our balls, you still need the right soccer ball to add to your soccer equipment. Different things need to be put into consideration including but not limited to, the level of play, material, quality, and ball size. We’ve taken all these into account when preparing this list of the best football balls available on the 2018 market so be sure to read on.
The first edition of our newly developed dual bonded production method is used in the new soccer ball called BLAZE DB. The construction of this ball consists of a PU-material laminated with 3 mm foam. Next, two layers of textile underlining are laminated to the foam layer to add stability. The panels are then 3D printed with 3mm edge glue and stitched by hand, In the heat mold the glue is activated to hide the stitches. Next, the seam sealing is done by hand. The glue in the seams reduces the water uptake significantly. The bladder inside is a SR-bladder with excellent air retention. The result is a soccer ball with both stability, control and a softer touch compared to other balls in the range.
Thanks to technology, finding a soccer ball is easy. Simply go online, research on the best balls out there, narrow down your search the top 10, 5 or 3 then read the reviews of people who have actually used them before. Thereafter, you can weigh the pros and cons to determine which ball is the best pick for you. The top 3 places to research on are:
This is a very special soccer ball which I’ll think you’ll fall in love with. At least that was the case with me. I must say that I don’t normally trust new comers in the industry of soccer equipment. I mostly prefer established companies like Adidas, Select or Brine. However, the guys at Bend-it (the company behind Kunckle-it) really changed my perspective.
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