Some additional information worth noting with this Adidas smart soccer ball is that you cannot use the sensor features for kicks once the ball is in motion. Users report you cannot use it for tracking stats associated with, for example, a drop kick. The ball must be sitting still on the ground before being kicked if you wish to track the statistics.
For the most part, the materials used with the GlowCity soccer ball are generally considered the worst materials by competitive players. Both the casing and the bladder are made of rubber. The only bright spot in terms of materials is the lining, which is made of wound nylon. While these materials are generally less desirable than many others are, they do have the advantage of making the GlowCity soccer ball one of the most durable that we reviewed.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
Select was founded by a famous Danish goalkeeper back in 1947. Eigil Nielsin knew what it takes to make a good soccer ball so he put his experience into action by starting his business. He produced the first soccer balls that came without lacing. So start your soccer journey with this excellent brand. If you buy a select soccer ball, I think you will never go back to any other brand.

The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
Update (2 years post-purchase): Still love this ball and it's in its fifth season of use! I've just ordered another for our team since the fall season makes for darker and darker practices on our unlighted scrimmage field and we've come to rely on this ball so much. My teenagers use this ball at home all the time, including playing "soccer tennis" on hard surfaces and for banging against a brick wall (all of the print is long gone from the outer surface). We even took it to the beach this year. It never fails to get a reaction from people who see it bouncing around in the dark. I did have to replace one of the two lights, but they're available from GlowCity and are very reasonably priced (I purchased a couple of extra lights, just in case). I also bought a pack of 100
This is a decision that your coach or manager get to decide for you if you are part of a team. Your own ball is one thing that you have control on. However, when it comes to what the team should play with, it is the manager’s job to pick which ball is the best, and what is appropriate for the team for training. Coaches usually stick to training match balls as they give the illusion of actual match balls.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
This soccer ball was purchased as a birthday gift for an 8 year old boy. He loves to play soccer and was thrilled to get this ball. However, as it comes deflated in a mostly plain white box - no pictures and no real description of what's inside, we inflated the ball and wrote a description ourselves. There was no printed info inside the box either, except for instructions in very tiny print on how to change the batteries. Nowhere were the size of the batteries identified! So, I was not happy with the packaging of this ball as a gift. However, the ball itself seemed to be of good quality and lit up easily when dropped or kicked and was a real "kid-pleaser". So overall, the product was good, but the packaging could be improved.
Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.
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