The next soccer ball on our list is the Under Armour Desafio 395. This soccer ball is built for training younger players and has the lowest price point of all the balls we’re comparing here. Since this ball is built with younger players in mind, it isn’t as heavy or durable as some of our options. However, at this price point, most reviewers agreed it’s a great play.

This can be used as a great option for goalkeeper training as well. Why? Look, you can hardly see the lines on this ball, hence you won’t be able to guess the direction by only seeing the spin of the ball. That means as a goalkeeper you will have to give full concentration to detect the direction of the sliding balls. This is obviously helpful if you are a goalkeeper, and looking for a sliding challenge.

The technology portions of this DribbleUp soccer ball are truly cool. This ball is designed to help you perfect your training and keep track of your progress over time. Amazingly, it doesn’t need to be charged in order to do this! It actually works with the DribbleUp application. The package comes with a smartphone stand and, once the application is downloaded, the application uses your phone camera to track movements and provide instant feedback. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any information regarding how this will impact your phone’s battery life. But I would recommend having a full battery before game play or keeping a charger handy just in case.
This is what the majority of quality soccer balls are made out of. It offers a great blend of durability and responsiveness and is the material most commonly used by professional leagues for their game balls. In fact, FIFA uses polyurethane, or PU, exclusively for their game balls. One thing that allows PU to stand out above many of the other materials is its versatility.
The ball has good texture. It seems to hold air pretty well. The design is cool and is definitely one that is not seen on the pitch or practice field normally. I only have concern that a few of the patches on the ball are not flush with the others. 2 of the small panels are a little raised than the others where the seems meet. When my son and I pass the ball on a perfect synthetic field, it seems to jump just slightly, but it could be in my head since I have seen the seems not level to each other in a few spots on the ball. Mine may be abnormal. Other than that, the ball seems very well made. It even makes the right noises when kicked hard. Overall pretty satisfied.
I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
For the most part, soccer balls are pretty affordable. Training soccer balls for kids start at under $10, and for around $60 or less, you can get a good, league-approved tournament soccer ball. Of course there are more expensive ones, depending on what you're looking for. Cost depends on the type of ball, materials, quality, and also the outlet you buy from. Our soccer balls can be bought economically in sets of six or more, or singly. Shopping online at Epic Sports can save you up to 60 percent if not more off retail prices on your favorite brands.

As a response to the problems with the balls in the 1962 FIFA World Cup, Adidas created the Adidas Santiago[17] – this led to Adidas winning the contract to supply the match balls for all official FIFA and UEFA matches, which they have held since the 1970s, and also for the Olympic Games.[18] They also supply the ball for the UEFA Champions League which is called the Adidas Finale.

Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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