Footballs have gone through a dramatic change over time. During medieval times balls were normally made from an outer shell of leather filled with cork shavings.[4] Another method of creating a ball was using animal bladders for the inside of the ball making it inflatable. However, these two styles of creating footballs made it easy for the ball to puncture and were inadequate for kicking. It was not until the 19th century that footballs developed into what a football looks like today.
This is by far the best ball for younger soccer players. I've had this ball for just under a week now, and I'm already seeing improvement in my knuckles. This ball, similarly to official match balls, has thermally fused panels, and doesn't absorb water. It also glides nicely in the air. It has a GREAT texture, and is fun to practice footwork and freestyling with, in addition to shooting. I looked for weeks to find an affordable match ball, and when I found this, I was thrilled! I am sort of a soccer nerd, and I spend much of my free time looking at cleats, balls, and shooting techniques, so I sort of know what I'm talking about, and I highly recommend this ball to anyone looking to improve their shooting skills, or anyone who simply wants an affordable match ball to use.
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
Some additional information worth noting with this Adidas smart soccer ball is that you cannot use the sensor features for kicks once the ball is in motion. Users report you cannot use it for tracking stats associated with, for example, a drop kick. The ball must be sitting still on the ground before being kicked if you wish to track the statistics.
The outside of the soccer ball is typically made from one of two materials: PVC or Polyurethane.  PVC is much more affordable and durable, and these are typically seen in training soccer balls because training balls go through much more of a continuous beating.  Polyurethane balls are usually even softer than PVC balls and its ability to go where you want it to go is much better than the PVC balls.  As a result, these are typically higher-end balls.  However, there are still various ways to construct them, and not all PVC or polyurethane balls are created the same.  Glossy coatings, which are very popular in the public fields with the kids and adults alike, are also very useful because they help reduce scuffing and the intake of water.
Whether you’re shopping for a street soccer ball or looking for the best football ball to help improve your skills and learn a few drills before your next competitive soccer match, you will never go wrong with any of the above soccer balls. We made sure to highlight the best products available in the market today made by top brands like Adidas and Nike so that you can find a high-quality ball with unique features that will help you improve your skills. These products will be a great long-term investment, and a must buy to add to your soccer equipment.
Much like PU or TPU for soccer ball casings, rubber is considered the best of both worlds for soccer ball bladders when it comes to striking a balance between responsiveness and air retention. Oddly enough, this balance does not actually inspire a greater adoption by either manufacturers or players, and as such, soccer balls with rubber bladders are less popular.
 As an International Match Standard and NFHS (high school) and NCAA-approved ball, this one gets a lot of play out of high schools and colleges in the United States.  And for good reason.  Every time I played with a select ball, I knew what to expect and I got each and every time.  Coming in a number of colors, this ball can be tailored to match your team while still looking classy with the white to contrast it.  It has a latex bladder and is hand-stitched.  This is a premium match soccer ball for the price of a practice ball.  Definitely a ball to consider looking into.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.

The soccer ball has gone through various changes just as the football game. As opposed to yesterday’s football ball that had stitches and seams and the classic black and white design, today’s soccer balls are designed with the latest technology that lets the ball bend more, fly quicker and also dip harder. Besides, they are quite soft that they let players kick the ball further without risking injuries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGp37du0xbQ
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