You have to wonder if a brand recognized mostly for baseball can make a good soccer ball, but this one seems like a worthy effort. It certainly has the look and feel of a high end ball, and the overall build seems pretty solid. It looks like they put some effort designing this product. My son and his team practiced with this several times and I would say the wear and tear look normal. No tearing at the seams or unusual gashes. He says the padding gives the ball a nice, soft touch even when fully inflated. One bonus is, with such an uncommon soccer brand, it easier to identify if it gets lost on field. The reason for the lack of 5 stars is that our sample has trouble holding air after a couple of days. I do not know if it is a characteristic of the ball or
Soccer balls have several panels that influence their flight characteristics and the amount of control a player can have while playing. International soccer competitions use a 32-panel ball. Major leagues use an 18-panel ball and indoor leagues use a 6-panel ball. High-end soccer balls have hand-stitched panels with a synthetic thread. A low-cost one for practice and training will usually have its panels glued together.
Ok i have read some of the negative reviews and i am sure there is the occasional faulty ball or the person who thinks they are buying a "regular match soccer ball"... that is not what this ball is designed for. It is an "ultra-durable" and nearly indestructible soccer ball. I have been buying these for 4 years and i give them away especially in Nicaragua. I would venture to say these balls are not designed for normal use in the USA on a manicured field... the flight, the touch is a little different... but if you play on hard surfaces, rocky roads, near barbed wire fences, in environments such as Nicaragua and other countries this is the best ball you can buy. I took my first ones to Nicaragua and left them and one was played with nearly every day for three years by some kids in a local
A quick inspection of the construction of the ball might help you make a quick decision. The first thing that you should look at is the panel of the ball. A soccer ball that has panels sewn together is a better choice than the ones that are glued together. The panels of a premium ball are stitched by hand while those of a lower quality are machine stitched.
Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.
This soccer ball was purchased as a birthday gift for an 8 year old boy. He loves to play soccer and was thrilled to get this ball. However, as it comes deflated in a mostly plain white box - no pictures and no real description of what's inside, we inflated the ball and wrote a description ourselves. There was no printed info inside the box either, except for instructions in very tiny print on how to change the batteries. Nowhere were the size of the batteries identified! So, I was not happy with the packaging of this ball as a gift. However, the ball itself seemed to be of good quality and lit up easily when dropped or kicked and was a real "kid-pleaser". So overall, the product was good, but the packaging could be improved.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
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