It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.

We found that the feeling of this ball was a bit harder than other soccer balls at this price point. This doesn’t affect the performance of the ball, as the movements were accurate and authentic when struck. The weight does tend to affect the foot and ankle over time, causing a bit of soreness after continuous play. It also features a machine-stitched construction that is accompanied by an internal nylon-wound carcass so the ball has an improved level of durability compared to other soccer balls at this price point.
The flight of the ball is accurate to the type of kick that put it into motion because of the 12 panels pieced together flawlessly. The Aerowtrac grooves allow the ball to soar through the air swiftly. The interior bladder is restricted to produce a healthy sphere full of air. The shape is retained even through heavy use and harsh playing conditions.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed.
Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.
This Superlative Match Soccer Ball was truly designed with the player in mind. It ensures excellent touch and trajectory and would be the best ball for players looking to improve their soccer skills and play like pros. It has a compression-balanced latex bladder and aero-textured microfiber shell that delivers smooth ball handling on the field while equally ensuring accurate control over its flight path through the air. It is hand-stitched and thermal bonded making it very durable and the most powerful soccer ball on the market. The GOLME soccer ball has bright neon and luminous pearl hues to give it a blood design that makes it look quite elegant and also improve your performance on the pitch.
Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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