In the year 1863, the first specifications for footballs were laid down by the Football Association. Previous to this, footballs were made out of inflated leather, with later leather coverings to help footballs maintain their shapes.[3] In 1872 the specifications were revised, and these rules have been left essentially unchanged as defined by the International Football Association Board. Differences in footballs created since this rule came into effect have been to do with the material used in their creation.
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Premium Match Balls. These are the most expensive soccer balls that you’ll find on the market today. They are FIFA-approved balls, so they meet all of the standards necessary for international play. Air retention, water-resistance, and performance are far superior when compared to a training ball. Virtually every professional league uses a ball of this quality for game play.

Much like PU or TPU for soccer ball casings, rubber is considered the best of both worlds for soccer ball bladders when it comes to striking a balance between responsiveness and air retention. Oddly enough, this balance does not actually inspire a greater adoption by either manufacturers or players, and as such, soccer balls with rubber bladders are less popular.
During the game, there were two different balls used: the 12 panel Argentine players model like this one and a T-shaped model used by Uruguay. There’s speculation the use of the two different balls actually played a part in the outcome of the game. Argentina started using this 12-panel ball and entered the halftime with a 2-1 lead. However, the T-shaped model used in the second half worked towards Uruguay’s advantage as they won 4-2 by the end of the match.
Law 1: The Field of Play Law 2: The Ball Law 3: The Number of Players Law 4: The Players' Equipment Law 5: The Referee Law 6: The Other Match Officials Law 7: The Duration of the Match Law 8: The Start and Restart of Play Law 9: The Ball In and Out of Play Law 10: The Method of Scoring Law 11: Offside Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct Law 13: Free kicks (direct and indirect) Law 14: The Penalty Kick Law 15: The Throw-In Law 16: The Goal Kick Law 17: The Corner Kick
However, this has not stopped players from preferring butyl as their bladder material of choice. In fact, this preference is so well cemented by players of all skill sets, that manufacturers professional game balls are just as likely to use butyl bladders as they are latex often times even more likely. It is interesting to note that butyl is more durable than latex but less durable than rubber-despite providing had better air retention.
Ok. I was skeptical about this ball...surprisingly it is bright. It seems smaller than a normal soccer ball so I measured it. Yep, 27” as stated. I wonder how long the batteries will last. I’ll update this review after the 1st pair die. feels durable. Lights upon kicking. Takes two sets of batteries to light entire ball so make sure you keep lots of replacements on hand otherwise you’ll end up with 1/2 the ball lit.
Besides just its sleek exterior, the Adidas Starlancer is crafted with longevity in mind by the nylon being wound internally and assembled through machine stitching to provide it with an extra level of strength. The exterior is made of TPU material, which is ideal for resisting cuts and scrapes. The bladder which holds the air is Butyl, which works wonders in keeping the shape of the ball perfect at all times.

Now let’s talk a bit about what is it that they are made of and sizes and it’s importance. Soccer is the best way to learn physics as you learn to control a ball’s movement, all the while studying the force you need to exert to get to that optimal point. Specially for a professional player or someone who is on the path to it. They must know ins and out while they learn to control it.
Outside of PU and TPU, pretty much every other material used for a soccer ball’s casing will be specialized for either durability or responsiveness. When it comes to synthetic leather, the focus is also exclusively on responsiveness and this is by far the most responsive material used for a soccer ball’s casing. It is important to note that PU, TPU, and PVC are all often labeled as synthetic leather.
This particular indoor ball has all the qualities that make it ideal for an indoor soccer ball. The exterior uses a soft felt material. The panels of this size 5 indoor ball are hand stitched which makes it more durable than machine stitched panels. Its bounce is not too high which sits well with the requirements of an indoor soccer ball. It is not too bouncy or light but it flies rather well when kicked. This gives the player ample control during a session. It has a comfortable texture that’s pleasant to hold, for a goalkeeper and comfortable for footwork especially if the player is barefooted. Has a bright color that makes it visible during a game. Players can easily keep track of it, especially in an indoor setting.
Any Messi die-hard fan will want to buy this Adidas Soccer Ball. Aside from having a football ball from a collection of a world-top striker, you’ll add to your soccer equipment a high-quality model with great features that guarantee excellent performance in the playground. It is available in different shades and sizes that fit kids and children above 12 years old. The ball’s machine-stitched construction makes it quite durable, and the internal nylon wound carcass ensures long-lasting performance. Besides, it has a butyl bladder that ensures best air retention.
This is the 4th one we've ordered! This is a tough ball that glows very brightly at night and comes with an extra battery, but we haven't had to change batteries after 2 summers of playing with it. Whenever my kids brought it out during our outdoor, night-time, community concerts, all the kids wanted to play with it and tons of parents came up to get the information on where to get it. I had originally ordered it so that my son could still see the ball at the end of his fall soccer practices, since they play on a field without lights. Now it is the favorite birthday present to give to all of my kids' friends (ages 7 and 11).
In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
If you are unsure of which size to get your child, I will recommend what size I think based off real-world use. The size 3 is good for any child until about first grade or second grade, which is when a child should move into a size 4. The size 4 should last until they get to middle school (around 6th or 7th grade), and then they would move into the adult official size 5.
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TX8dExPIWc
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