This ball truly lives up to its name as a “glider,” having a stable flight path when shot and a nice feel when passed. The surface is relatively grippy, which is great for goalkeepers looking to practice their catches. Because the ball isn’t as slippery as some other replicas, you can shoot it with a bit more swerve, and dribbling and skill moves are a bit easier.

This is a felt cover ball, which is the major characteristics of an indoor soccer ball. Durable felt cover offers the softness and helps to control the rebounding characteristics. This is a size 5 ball with hand stitched panels. Hand stitched panels are more durable than machine stitched panels. The bounce is not too high, which should be the case of a standard indoor soccer ball.


In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
A ball is just a ball, right? Well, it’s not quite that simple any more. Some important things to consider are what the ball is constructed of, what material is used for the lining or bladder and, to state the obvious, the size of ball you require, which will depend on the ages of the players and the ball’s intended use, be it for training or match games.
Due to it being significantly softer than the other types of rubbers used for soccer ball bladders, latex is generally seen as the premier material. Though, this same perception may not hold as true for practice balls or even game balls at lower levels of competition. This is because latex bladders retain air worse than all of the other soccer ball bladder materials and will need to be re-inflated more often.
A factor that makes this official match soccer ball popular is its high-quality features paired up with its affordable price. Its thermal bonded construction is FIFA’s highest quality standard in construction for match balls. Its exterior uses the PU material and is 100% water-proof. The graphics also facilitate high visual response. The butyl bladder facilitates high air retention while the VPM (Valve Position Marker) technology will show you the precise foot placement.
Official Nike Merlin Match Ball used within the ACC division of NCAA collegiate soccer. This is a used ball with some minor scuffs and sharpie on the ball. The ball holds air perfectly and has no defects during play. This ball does not come with the original packaging as they come in bulk. The ball is too scuffed to be played during official games, so there are surplus between these and practice balls. This ball will ship deflated to make shipping cheaper. Will ship fast. No returns.
Latex bladders are used in high-quality balls. These kind of bladders are soft and provide good feeling. They offer better response and bounce than Butyl bladders, but the downside of this kind of bladder is they don’t hold the air for too long. As a result, they require filling more frequently. Air escapes due to micropores on the cover, but nowadays some balls are constructed with carbon latex bladder to help to close these micropores. As a result, the balls can hold air for a longer period.
In 1838, Charles Goodyear introduced vulcanized rubber, which dramatically improved the football.[5] Vulcanisation is the treatment of rubber to give it certain qualities such as strength, elasticity, and resistance to solvents. Vulcanisation of rubber also helps the football resist moderate heat and cold. Vulcanisation helped create inflatable bladders that pressurize the outer panel arrangement of the football. Charles Goodyear's innovation increased the bounce ability of the ball and made it easier to kick. Most balls of this time had tanned leather with eighteen sections stitched together. These were arranged in six panels of three strips each.[6][7]
Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.
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