What are the different types of soccer balls? Should I buy an expensive one, a middle priced one or a cheap one? What kind of balls are adequate for my needs?  Most soccer balls can be divided into three different categories, professional match balls, match balls, and practice balls.  The type you need of course depends on how and where you want to use the soccer ball. For more information on types of soccer balls, click here. 
 I’ll be honest right out of the gate in saying that I don’t have any experience with Senda.  But after looking at this ball, I will have to try one out soon!  Senda brings a very classic look to its ball, giving you a throwback to days gone by.  It has 32 panels and claims that it can be used outdoors, indoors, and on turf.  It is hand stitched with premium leather and has four layers of hybrid polyester and cotton linings between the cover and the bladder to help it last longer.  It is NHFS approved with its latex bladder, so it would be great for use in high school matches.  And especially considering it’s low cost.
This is a very special soccer ball which I’ll think you’ll fall in love with. At least that was the case with me. I must say that I don’t normally trust new comers in the industry of soccer equipment. I mostly prefer established companies like Adidas, Select or Brine. However, the guys at Bend-it (the company behind Kunckle-it) really changed my perspective.
Premium Match Balls. These are the most expensive soccer balls that you’ll find on the market today. They are FIFA-approved balls, so they meet all of the standards necessary for international play. Air retention, water-resistance, and performance are far superior when compared to a training ball. Virtually every professional league uses a ball of this quality for game play.
 As an International Match Standard and NFHS (high school) and NCAA-approved ball, this one gets a lot of play out of high schools and colleges in the United States.  And for good reason.  Every time I played with a select ball, I knew what to expect and I got each and every time.  Coming in a number of colors, this ball can be tailored to match your team while still looking classy with the white to contrast it.  It has a latex bladder and is hand-stitched.  This is a premium match soccer ball for the price of a practice ball.  Definitely a ball to consider looking into.

The second edition of the new dual bonded production method is the Target DB. This new ball is both machine-stiched and sealed with glue. The contstruction consists of a PU-material laminated with 3.5 mm foam. Two layers of textile underlining are them laminated to the foam layers to add stability. Finally, the panels are 3D printed with a 3mm edge glue and stitched together. The glue is activated in the heat mold to hide the stitches and the seam sealing is done by hand. By using glue in the sealing of the seams, the water uptake is reduced significantly.The bladder inside is a SR-bladder with excellent air retention. The result is a soccer ball with both stability, control and a softer touch compared to other balls in the range.

This soccer ball is virtually indestructible. The manufacturers have designed it to withstand any challenge yet still keep afloat. It can be run over by a truck yet it will still maintain its balance. Set it ablaze and it will still hold its ground. Instead of air, this ball uses a unique foam known as ethylene-vinyl acetate foam. With this, the ball will never need a pump and will never go flat even when punctured. This special foam reinflates the ball when the need arises. This is a durable ball and you can use it on all types of playgrounds: concrete, grass, sand or any other surface.
Soccer ball covers are meant to protect the construction of a ball, and make it more durable and long lasting. Manufacturers use two types of materials, mainly polyurethane (PU) or polyvinyl carbonate (PVC). PVC is the cheaper and much affordable variant, but it is more durable than PU. It has scuff-resistance, which makes it perfect for training soccer balls. PU is used for match balls, since it is softer than a PVC soccer ball and tends to respond better to contact.
With 3 sizes available, there is an appropriate ball for every age group, including number 5, which has the official dimensions. Because there are numerous sizes to choose from, the Glider II is a recommended choice for practicing drills for beginners new to the game and perhaps needing to start with a smaller ball. With its long-lasting material, performance is guaranteed with a ball built for
Footballs have gone through a dramatic change over time. During medieval times balls were normally made from an outer shell of leather filled with cork shavings.[4] Another method of creating a ball was using animal bladders for the inside of the ball making it inflatable. However, these two styles of creating footballs made it easy for the ball to puncture and were inadequate for kicking. It was not until the 19th century that footballs developed into what a football looks like today.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
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