For the most part, the materials used with the GlowCity soccer ball are generally considered the worst materials by competitive players. Both the casing and the bladder are made of rubber. The only bright spot in terms of materials is the lining, which is made of wound nylon. While these materials are generally less desirable than many others are, they do have the advantage of making the GlowCity soccer ball one of the most durable that we reviewed.
For the most part, the materials used with the GlowCity soccer ball are generally considered the worst materials by competitive players. Both the casing and the bladder are made of rubber. The only bright spot in terms of materials is the lining, which is made of wound nylon. While these materials are generally less desirable than many others are, they do have the advantage of making the GlowCity soccer ball one of the most durable that we reviewed.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
Finding the best soccer ball is important. You don’t use a ball only once and you keep on pushing and stepping on it all the time. Your typical soccer ball is not something that you usually handle with care and attention. So you need to buy something reliable that will not get cut with frequent use. At the same time, you need something that comes in the right size, weight and feel. When the ball is too heavy or too light you will not be able to use it properly.
I bought this ball for a non-traditional use: my miniature donkey LOVES to roll and toss balls, and slightly deflated soccer balls seem to be easiest for him to grab. We've had this one for several months now, and it has withstood his rough play extremely well. In fact, I'm back to buy another so we have a backup in case our first gets lost. I definitely recommend!
Just received the ball and was pleasantly surprised. I took it outside with my high school aged kids and kicked it around. We only played for about 15 minutes, but I couldn't find anything to gripe about. It's a slightly textured ball and flew true. I'm probably going to order several for my high school soccer team and see if they hold up over time. I did NOT like that it shipped inflated though.
I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
Adidas spared little expense with this soccer ball and made sure that the materials used could pass almost any standard for grass fields. First, the casing is made of polyurethane, providing a great balance between responsiveness and durability-though they further increased the responsiveness with 3D textures. The bladder is made out of butyl, so you will not have to worry about constantly reinflating it, while the ball is lined with soft and water-resistant polyester.
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
This ball has been through all of the hazards that kids can dream up. Dribbling the ball on pavement walking to the car, practicing shots against a brick school, being used as a seat, heavy use at practice, and its frequent selection as the game ball. With all of that, it still looks great with very little wear and tear. Could still pass as a new ball from a few feet away. It's held it's pressure very well. The outer shell texture allows good grip without being to soft or too hard.

Huge fan of Bend-It, I would not consider buying any other brand of ball. I have 4 or 5 different styles that have been used and abused during club training and off-season indoor games. It's fun watching another coach pick it out of a crowd of balls to check the brand. I've even had a pro player pick this ball out of a crowd to use in group training sessions (Go STL FC!!)
This can be used as a great option for goalkeeper training as well. Why? Look, you can hardly see the lines on this ball, hence you won’t be able to guess the direction by only seeing the spin of the ball. That means as a goalkeeper you will have to give full concentration to detect the direction of the sliding balls. This is obviously helpful if you are a goalkeeper, and looking for a sliding challenge.
While the ball features high-quality materials, the focus with this ball is all the smart features and less about the physical make-up of the ball, which doesn’t come in handy when you’re researching! What I did find with this ball is that it’s match quality and built to last. It’s also available in sizes 4 or 5 for multiple ages and training levels.
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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