Bought this as a birthday gift for a 10-yr old boy who loves soccer. The ball is made of a durable rubber material, but it is official weight and size for those who are wondering. The rubber exterior gives the ball more bounce than a typical "official" soccer ball, but IMO it makes the ball more fun to kick around as well as more durable. There are 2 LED lights inside the ball which illuminate when the ball is kicked or tossed onto the ground. LED's shut off automatically after about a minute of inactivity which helps conserve the batteries. No more calling off the soccer game when the sun sets, this ball makes it possible to play in pitch dark conditions and is a blast to kick around. Fun for all ages, kids as well as adults. Great buy, 5 stars.
You have to wonder if a brand recognized mostly for baseball can make a good soccer ball, but this one seems like a worthy effort. It certainly has the look and feel of a high end ball, and the overall build seems pretty solid. It looks like they put some effort designing this product. My son and his team practiced with this several times and I would say the wear and tear look normal. No tearing at the seams or unusual gashes. He says the padding gives the ball a nice, soft touch even when fully inflated. One bonus is, with such an uncommon soccer brand, it easier to identify if it gets lost on field. The reason for the lack of 5 stars is that our sample has trouble holding air after a couple of days. I do not know if it is a characteristic of the ball or
Our next soccer ball on the list is the DribbleUp Smart Soccer Ball. This ball is the second (and only other) “smart” ball on our list. Like the Adidas brand ball, this DribbleUp ball is designed for use with a smart device and application for training. There are a lot of features to love about this ball; however, it’s more expensive than the Adidas alternative.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.

This is by far the best ball for younger soccer players. I've had this ball for just under a week now, and I'm already seeing improvement in my knuckles. This ball, similarly to official match balls, has thermally fused panels, and doesn't absorb water. It also glides nicely in the air. It has a GREAT texture, and is fun to practice footwork and freestyling with, in addition to shooting. I looked for weeks to find an affordable match ball, and when I found this, I was thrilled! I am sort of a soccer nerd, and I spend much of my free time looking at cleats, balls, and shooting techniques, so I sort of know what I'm talking about, and I highly recommend this ball to anyone looking to improve their shooting skills, or anyone who simply wants an affordable match ball to use.
Another type of soccer ball that some players may find to be useful is the indoor soccer ball. Indoor balls are designed to have less bounce and rebound to them, making it possible to control the ball on a tighter court or field. The cover of an indoor ball is also the strongest of any category, so it can withstand play on turn, hard court surfaces, and impacts with walls.
Excellent texture for a size 4 ball. I purchased this ball for my son who is playing in a U9 team. It's soft and many kids like this ball. On home games it is our game ball. It arrived properly inflated and 2 months later, I still have not had the need to add air. Expect faster wear and tear if your kid plays on concrete. :( I would recommend this ball.
Much like the Adidas ball we saw earlier, this offering from Adidas is top-of-the-line.  This a premium match ball that also has received the highest rating from FIFA.  To get that rating, it passed tests on its weight, how it retains air, the shape, and how well it keeps water out.  It also has seamless panels like the Hi-Vis Champions League ball.  Although not a cheap ball, this is worth a look if you are interested I premium match balls.
MacGregor’s football ball has an official size of 4. It is the best rubber soccer ball to buy for a low price. It is a great starter ball for your little one and comes from high-quality materials that make it durable. Its Extended-life molded construction makes it the best playground soccer ball for kids. Besides, many customers recommend the MacGregor Rubber Soccer Ball because aside from being quite durable, it is pretty economical and worth the money you put on it.
Machine stitched paneling and the nylon wound carcass helps to mold the shape that is inflated to a perfect circle due to its butyl bladder, which maintains its structure at all times. Using an abrasion resistant TPU exterior, the ball retains its style no matter where it is being played with. The synthetic panels are strong yet comfortable on the side of feet making it a terrific ball to practice skill-building.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
Much like PU or TPU for soccer ball casings, rubber is considered the best of both worlds for soccer ball bladders when it comes to striking a balance between responsiveness and air retention. Oddly enough, this balance does not actually inspire a greater adoption by either manufacturers or players, and as such, soccer balls with rubber bladders are less popular.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
Update (2 years post-purchase): Still love this ball and it's in its fifth season of use! I've just ordered another for our team since the fall season makes for darker and darker practices on our unlighted scrimmage field and we've come to rely on this ball so much. My teenagers use this ball at home all the time, including playing "soccer tennis" on hard surfaces and for banging against a brick wall (all of the print is long gone from the outer surface). We even took it to the beach this year. It never fails to get a reaction from people who see it bouncing around in the dark. I did have to replace one of the two lights, but they're available from GlowCity and are very reasonably priced (I purchased a couple of extra lights, just in case). I also bought a pack of 100
How Do I inflate my soccer balls? Soccer balls lose air pressure over time. Sometimes over a few days (soccer balls that use butyl bladders keep air pressure longer than balls that use latex bladders). Be sure to check the pressure frequently to make sure the ball is properly inflated.  Therefore, invest in a good ball pump, have a supply of inflation needles and use a low pressure gauge to measure for proper inflation. 
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
Adidas spared little expense with this soccer ball and made sure that the materials used could pass almost any standard for grass fields. First, the casing is made of polyurethane, providing a great balance between responsiveness and durability-though they further increased the responsiveness with 3D textures. The bladder is made out of butyl, so you will not have to worry about constantly reinflating it, while the ball is lined with soft and water-resistant polyester.
To be honest, this ball’s a bit like a classic car, in that it’s awesome – when it works. The Jabulani is prone to valve issues, although they can be fixed. If you need something durable, we wouldn’t recommend this ball. However, if you’re looking to add an awesome ball to your collection – and you’ve got the cash – consider grabbing a Jabulani before they go extinct.
List of the best soccer balls as ranked by avid soccer players. Soccer is a competitive game. In order to win, you'll need some skills and the right soccer ball. There are many different soccer balls on the market, but having a top rated ball can help you score the goal. You might be asking yourself, "How can the best soccer balls help me?" The top ranked soccer balls are created to last for years. They are made of durable material that can hold up game after game.
This is by far the best ball for younger soccer players. I've had this ball for just under a week now, and I'm already seeing improvement in my knuckles. This ball, similarly to official match balls, has thermally fused panels, and doesn't absorb water. It also glides nicely in the air. It has a GREAT texture, and is fun to practice footwork and freestyling with, in addition to shooting. I looked for weeks to find an affordable match ball, and when I found this, I was thrilled! I am sort of a soccer nerd, and I spend much of my free time looking at cleats, balls, and shooting techniques, so I sort of know what I'm talking about, and I highly recommend this ball to anyone looking to improve their shooting skills, or anyone who simply wants an affordable match ball to use.
Soccer — or football as it's known around the world — is arguably the most loved sport on Earth. Although Americans still aren't as enamored of the sport as the rest of the world is, teams around the country are stealing hearts and minds, and Americans are getting into the game. For years, soccer has been a sport played by kids, college students, and ex-pats, but it's now being cheered in stadiums and watched on national TV.
×