Please note, there are only 3 sizes available for this model; size 5, size 4, and size 3. So it is crucial that if you are looking for size 2 or size 1, then this is not an option for you. So, choose the right size before buying so that you don’t regret after receiving the purchase. If you are not sure which size means what then click here to read our guideline.
Soccer balls come in different variants and choosing one that is right will depend on how you prefer your ball and how you would like to use it. Soccer balls are built of different materials mostly made out of common rubber, polyurethane, nylon or polyvinyl chloride. While polyvinyl chloride balls can get really durable, they may not be as soft and touch responsive as polyurethane blend balls.

What is the difference between a high quality soccer ball and a low quality soccer ball? When purchasing soccer balls, many people buy according to the price of the ball. If a ball is expensive, that meant that it is a high quality ball and if it was a low costing ball, the ball is a low quality. That is not always true. Many players, coaches, clubs and even professionals do not know what type of ball to buy for their particular needs.  Please go to the following Soccer Ball World page to start learning about the construction of the various types of soccer balls, click here.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
Early footballs began as animal bladders or stomachs that would easily fall apart if kicked too much. Improvements became possible in the 19th century with the introduction of rubber and discoveries of vulcanization by Charles Goodyear. The modern 32-panel ball design was developed in 1962 by Eigil Nielsen, and technological research continues today to develop footballs with improved performance. The 32-panel ball design was soon overcome by 24-panel balls as well as 42-panel balls, both of which improved performance compared to before, in 2007.[citation needed]
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
This is a decision being made by a league operator or manager of some sort, this section is important for you.  For the individual, there isn’t much of a determination here.  If you want something really nice like the pros, go premium.  But if not, then you probably will just want to go with a training ball.  But for people equipping their teams with materials, this is a decision that needs to be taken seriously.  I would suggest that recreational leagues stick with training match balls, even for matches.  The number of kicks that the ball will get and the improper technique will cause headaches for you if you decide to buy premium balls.  For high schools, I suggest just regular match balls as many are still learning the basics of the game and many teams simply play “kickball” at that age.  For college teams, semi-pros, serious travel clubs, and of course, professional teams, I suggest premium match balls for play!
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TX8dExPIWc
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