Rounding out our list is just a good old, cool-looking training ball from the people over at Puma.  This ball comes will three distinct colors on it.  Black is in the middle of pink and yellow, so this would be an absolute dream for the soccer-loving girl in your life!  It is machine stitched for durability and a very soft feel.  It holds up for extended periods of time and does so starting at a very low price, so take a look for yourself!
The inner lining and the bladder are some of the key components of a soccer ball’s construction. These components are the factors that give control to the shape and the feel of a soccer ball. The usual match soccer ball has four layers of a blended polyester and cotton material in its lining, while mid-range ones have two cotton and polyester layers.

A soccer ball can look awesome, but if it lacks good response you're never going to fall in love with it. Your game really comes down to how well your ball performs. One trick you can do in the store to test a ball's performance is to give it a spin in the air. A well-balanced ball should spin smoothly. That will mean smooth sailing on the field. If you can, try it out. Try several of them until you find the one that feels just right.


We covered the quality in small detail above, but we’ll look into a little further here.  The quality of the ball you pick is very important.  If you want exactly what the pros play with, then you will have to pay a little more as a result of picking the premium choice. Those balls fly better and more true than their counterparts, but they are not meant to be practiced with on a regular basis.  Premium balls tend to have a softer impact on both your cleats and ankle guards to allow for more ball control and handling.  After the “premium” match ball category is the “match ball” category.  These aren’t nearly as expensive as the premiums are, but are still very good in match situations.  These aren’t meant for practice, but they typically can hold up for extended periods of time, possibly a season or two.  The third type is “training balls.”  These balls are meant for training and practice, and they can be used continuously without doing damage to it.  I have some great training balls that have lasted upwards of six years!  The quality of training balls has gone up drastically over the years that I have been playing.  When I was younger, some of them were so hard that you’d feel like your foot was broken after kicking them.  Nowadays, they literally feel like a premium ball with their softness and their flight.  So, almost any ball is great nowadays from the right supplier!
I’ve been a fan of soccer since I was 12, and choosing the right ball has always been an issue for me for many reasons ( size of the ball, its cover get torn easily, the ball don’t last long). this article had shed the light on everything you should take into consideration when buying a soccer ball, it was a very informative and well explained article it made me feel engrossed while reading it, so thanks for sharing. The Knuckle-it Pro soccer ball caught my attention, the features of this ball suits my needs as I love freekicks and I don’t really care about the brands. I’ll keep this ball in my mind for sure, when i consider buying a new ball.
Another type of soccer ball that some players may find to be useful is the indoor soccer ball. Indoor balls are designed to have less bounce and rebound to them, making it possible to control the ball on a tighter court or field. The cover of an indoor ball is also the strongest of any category, so it can withstand play on turn, hard court surfaces, and impacts with walls.
Law 1: The Field of Play Law 2: The Ball Law 3: The Number of Players Law 4: The Players' Equipment Law 5: The Referee Law 6: The Other Match Officials Law 7: The Duration of the Match Law 8: The Start and Restart of Play Law 9: The Ball In and Out of Play Law 10: The Method of Scoring Law 11: Offside Law 12: Fouls and Misconduct Law 13: Free kicks (direct and indirect) Law 14: The Penalty Kick Law 15: The Throw-In Law 16: The Goal Kick Law 17: The Corner Kick
Whereas plenty of manufacturers that we reviewed opted to go with a soccer ball that was more durable than responsive, Mikasa takes the opposite approach and focuses primarily on the touch that their ball can provide. This is most apparent in the soccer ball’s choice of casing material. The synthetic leather casing of the Mikasa is by far the softest and naturally responsive-without the inclusion of texture-out of any other soccer ball we reviewed.
Any Messi die-hard fan will want to buy this Adidas Soccer Ball. Aside from having a football ball from a collection of a world-top striker, you’ll add to your soccer equipment a high-quality model with great features that guarantee excellent performance in the playground. It is available in different shades and sizes that fit kids and children above 12 years old. The ball’s machine-stitched construction makes it quite durable, and the internal nylon wound carcass ensures long-lasting performance. Besides, it has a butyl bladder that ensures best air retention.
This ball uses installed sensors in it. These sensors collects data and shares it to your iOs and Android app via Bluetooth. Additionally, it gives you tips on how to improve your performance and compares kicks to keep track of your progress. Minimal maintenance is required as a single charge of this smart ball takes an hour and will facilitate about 2000 kicks each week. Its casing uses PU and the bladder – butyl. This ball has 32 thermal bonded panels hence increased control.
Furthermore, cleaning the ball is a very important task that you must do on a regular basis. It could help you avoid water absorption issues, and it will help make it last longer. Clean a soccer ball with some mild soap and lukewarm water to maintain its performance. Don’t use harsh cleaning agents as this might damage the ball’s construction material. Storing the ball in low temperatures is ideal to avoid warping or water retention. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TX8dExPIWc
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