The outer casing of a soccer ball is composed of panels made from synthetic materials, such as PVC, PU, or a combination, sewn or glued together. Soccer ball casings are rarely leather anymore, since leather tends to absorb moisture making the ball heavier and not perform as well. The number of panels or sections of the outer casing varies according to design. Most professional soccer balls are the 32-panel design. More panels mean a rounder and stabler ball, and a more accurate flight.
By no means is this type of ball similar to a typical soccer ball. For starters, instead of air, its bladder is filled with foam. In this case, the ball has less bounce and is heavier in order to facilitate its purpose; meant to be used on a hard surface indoors. This size 4 ball may also have suede castings which help to stabilize the ball on a slippery floor.
The exclusive design of the exterior hides a football manufactured in specially-developed Japanese TEIJIN microfibre, which makes the ball seem significantly softer than its predecessor. Without compromising on material thickness or adding foam, we have achieved a thoroughly tested feeling of liveliness and lightness – while naturally also preserving the good characteristics such as control and stability that have always characterised a BRILLANT SUPER.The material may be Japanese but BRILLANT SUPER is produced as always by our year-long supplier in Pakistan. The ball is sewn by hand and produced in quality materials from its innermost to its outermost layers. The Zero-Wing bladder ensures that the ball remains in constant balance throughout its flight through the air and a Double-Lock butyl valve ensures that it is practically airtight.​

As an avid soccer player and coach, I know it is important to have a suitable ball. First off, this ball arrived fully inflated, which is always a plus. This way I don't have to run around trying to find a pump and needle in order to inflate it. My toddler immediately started kicking it around the house once I was able to get it out of the package! I also love the feel of this ball. It is easy to grip and allows for easy ball handling. The colors are perfect, too. It is a little boring to play with a ball whose colors are dull or faded. The contrast between the blue and electric yellow is perfect. The colors make the ball easy to see.

If you have gone through this article that we have prepared for you to choose the best soccer ball, then we are confident that, you are now able to take an educated, and wise decision to buy the top soccer ball according to your requirement. During the process of our reviews and making this buying guide, we tried to pick the best soccer balls for the money.


The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
You have to wonder if a brand recognized mostly for baseball can make a good soccer ball, but this one seems like a worthy effort. It certainly has the look and feel of a high end ball, and the overall build seems pretty solid. It looks like they put some effort designing this product. My son and his team practiced with this several times and I would say the wear and tear look normal. No tearing at the seams or unusual gashes. He says the padding gives the ball a nice, soft touch even when fully inflated. One bonus is, with such an uncommon soccer brand, it easier to identify if it gets lost on field. The reason for the lack of 5 stars is that our sample has trouble holding air after a couple of days. I do not know if it is a characteristic of the ball or
This is what the majority of quality soccer balls are made out of. It offers a great blend of durability and responsiveness and is the material most commonly used by professional leagues for their game balls. In fact, FIFA uses polyurethane, or PU, exclusively for their game balls. One thing that allows PU to stand out above many of the other materials is its versatility.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practising freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
This is a decision that your coach or manager get to decide for you if you are part of a team. Your own ball is one thing that you have control on. However, when it comes to what the team should play with, it is the manager’s job to pick which ball is the best, and what is appropriate for the team for training. Coaches usually stick to training match balls as they give the illusion of actual match balls.

Latex bladders are one of the best materials when it comes to ball construction. However, with latex bladders, air won’t last as long as butyl bladders and will need more attention for proper inflation. Butyl-blend bladders hold in the air much better, but they are harder and less receptive in play. Mid-priced balls will usually have a mix of butyl and rubber. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1SVcjYY6TE
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