I’m playing soccer since I was 10, since 2005. I have also played it before, but I was not so serious as after. At the age of 10, I started to practice it seriously. Now I’m still playing it. During my career, I have tried, changed and played with many different soccer balls. Because I have tested so many of them, I have also created my top best soccer balls which you can see below.
This size five blue soccer ball is an updated classic ball with a traditional 32-panel machine stitched design and a fun, colorful look. It is a great soccer ball for training and comes with a long-lasting air retention bladder that helps reduce deflation. The Pro Trainer new soccer ball has a durable cover with counter balanced graphics. Franklin Sports is a reputable company with years of experience making the best soccer equipment, and you’ll undoubtedly want to purchase one of their soccer balls if you want to train and play like a pro.

First of all these balls are good because they are high quality and by having such soccer balls you won’t need to buy new ones so quickly, because these are durable and you will use them longer. They are not just durable, with them you also have better touch with the ball and you can handle easier and better the ball. It is sure easier to train and improve ball control with professional soccer ball.
Kelsey is a wife and work from home mommy of two beautiful children. A former medical assistant, Kelsey now focuses on writing and reviewing products to help other work from home mom and dads lives a little easier. She has passion for technology and learning, If you ask Kelsey, the words "A type" and "organized" wouldn’t even begin to describe her.
What are the requirements of a soccer ball used in matches?  Requirement information for soccer balls are usually found with the officiating organization that the match or game is played under. Contact the organization that runs the game that the soccer ball is going to be used in.  To learn more about the soccer ball laws of FIFA and NFHS, click here.
During the 1900s, footballs were made out of rubber and leather which was perfect for bouncing and kicking the ball; however, when heading the football (hitting it with the player's head) it was usually painful. This problem was most probably due to water absorption of the leather from rain, which caused a considerable increase in weight, causing head or neck injury. By around 2017, this had also been associated with dementia in former players.[8][9] Another problem of early footballs was that they deteriorated quickly, as the leather used in manufacturing the footballs varied in thickness and in quality.[6]
I bought three and used them for juggling, shooting practice and kicking against a wall. I juggled 90,000 times in 3 months, and shot many times on goal and kicked against walls. These are very durable. I look for durability in practice balls and these are superb. I wonder if Wilson has the newer cover pattern with the same internal structure in any model of ball. It would be wise to do that for the sake of staying current. I love the feel when kicking. Variable amounts of air can be used based on personal preference while practicing. A little less air allows a more forgiving bounce while juggling.
Soccer balls come in different variants and choosing one that is right will depend on how you prefer your ball and how you would like to use it. Soccer balls are built of different materials mostly made out of common rubber, polyurethane, nylon or polyvinyl chloride. While polyvinyl chloride balls can get really durable, they may not be as soft and touch responsive as polyurethane blend balls.
A football, soccer ball, or association football ball is the ball used in the sport of association football. The name of the ball varies according to whether the sport is called "football", "soccer", or "association football". The ball's spherical shape, as well as its size, weight, and material composition, are specified by Law 2 of the Laws of the Game maintained by the International Football Association Board. Additional, more stringent, standards are specified by FIFA and subordinate governing bodies for the balls used in the competitions they sanction.

The bladder, or the inside, of the soccer ball, is also very important to talk about.  There are typically only two choices that they are made out of butyl and latex.  The higher-end balls usually are latex while butyl is typically meant for training balls.  However, butyl is much better at keeping the air and shape of the ball for longer periods!   
Like many soccer balls that we reviewed, whenever a manufacturer makes it a point to offer an incredibly durable soccer ball, they ultimately make a soccer ball that is not very responsive. This is the case with the Wilson as well and is primarily a result of the materials chose. The PVC casing and nylon lining might be incredibly durable, but they do not offer much give. Aside from reducing the ball’s responsiveness, this also makes the Wilson a bit more painful to kick for long periods.
Today's footballs are more complex than past footballs. Most modern footballs consist of twelve regular pentagonal and twenty regular hexagonal panels positioned in a truncated icosahedron spherical geometry.[4] Some premium-grade 32-panel balls use non-regular polygons to give a closer approximation to sphericality.[12] The inside of the football is made up of a latex bladder which enables the football to be pressurised. The ball's panel pairs are stitched along the edge; this procedure can either be performed manually or with a machine.[5] The size of a football is roughly 22 cm (8.65 inches) in diameter for a regulation size 5 ball. Rules state that a size 5 ball must be 68 to 70 cm in circumference. Averaging that to 69 cm and then dividing by π gives about 22 cm for a diameter.
Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.
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